Prayers for Harvest

I love the autumn harvest season, and I believe it has many lessons for us about prayer:

  • There is a time and season for harvest. We cannot harvest at our convenience; neither should we expect God’s answers and our circumstances to arrange themselves around our wishes. Instead, as we pray, we should watch and wait, ready to do what is necessary in the meantime, and ready when the time is right for harvest. Too soon or too late, and we will miss the best of the crop, or lose it altogether. If we pray for a harvest, we must be willing to wait on God’s timing.
  • Harvest is a season among other seasons– not a single event. If I pick apples this fall, that is not the end of apples. There will be more apples to harvest next autumn, and the following year. Sometimes, we must wait through several seasons to see the harvest; seasons of rain, sun, even snow and cold dark days. We must be faithful to keep praying for the next harvest, and the next…
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  • The harvest bears little resemblance to what we planted. If I plant an ugly bulb in the ground this fall, I may see a beautiful tulip next spring–unless I plant an onion bulb! If I plant some tiny black seeds in the spring, I may harvest a large orange carrot later in the summer. If I plant kernels of corn, I will get new kernels, but they will be on an ear on a tall stalk. If we are praying for a harvest, it may come in ways and shapes and circumstances that will surprise, or even mystify us. Often, we pray for what we imagine we could do– instead, we need to learn to ask for what only God can do!
  • We cannot control the harvest– we can plant the seeds, fertilize them, tend them, weed them, water them, prune them–but we cannot predict or guarantee the results. But if we do nothing, we will not see any harvest at all. Similarly, we do not control God’s answers to our prayers, but we will see no growth, no harvest, if we do not pray at all, or if we give up.
  • Harvest is gathering the crop (and the seeds for a new crop). We need to gather prayer requests, thanksgiving lists, areas of conviction, songs of praise; we need to present a bountiful harvest of prayer–an offering and a fragrant sacrifice to the giver of all good things!
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Bringing in the Leaves

It’s fall here in western Michigan, and that means falling leaves…lots of them!  In cities and larger towns, there are leaf “pick up” schedules.  Trucks come along at appointed times to pick up leaves that have been raked and piled up by the roadside or placed (along with other yard waste, sticks and such) into waste bins. In smaller towns and around the countryside, leaves will be raked, piled up and burned or placed in compost heaps and bins.  In a few cases, leaves will be left where they fall or are carried by the wind until the snow covers them, to be rediscovered in the spring when the snow melts off.

pave covered on red leaf between trees
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Falling leaves are part of the cycle of every year.  They announce the advent of autumn, delighting us with their colors for a few short weeks.  But when that task is done, they fall beneath our feet to be stepped on, swept up, burned up or forgotten.  Gone are the memories of shoots and buds blooming in the spring, or rich green leaves shading us from the intense heat and light of summer. Leaves are ephemeral.  They pass out of memory and time, their swirling colors lost in a heap of crunchy detritus underfoot.

photography of maple trees
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People are not leaves.  We share the same creator, but God has placed eternity in the minds, hearts, and souls of humankind.  Whether we are blooming, changing color, falling, or being swept aside in this world, God will gather us all in a great harvest of souls.  But we will not be turned to ash or mulched into compost.  We face an eternal destiny; one where our true “colors” will be permanent, and our placement fixed.  We will either be raised to vibrant life, attached to the source of life and abundance; or we will be eternally “fallen”, swept away by judgment and guilt and the consequences of rebellion.

photography of graveyard under cloudy sky
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That may sound harsh and dramatic, but it is written in our soul–we feel it as we watch the withering leaves let go of the tree or smell the acrid of the burn pile.  We feel the pain and injustice of people being treated like no more than dead leaves– swept away as just another inconvenience.

woman holding orange maple leaf
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Today, I want to look for fallen leaves–we are all “fallen” from Grace, but some have also “fallen” through the cracks or by the wayside–look for people and seek ways I can pray for, reach out to, and offer Hope and Grace, especially to those whom life has swept aside.  Someone did it for me…Now it’s time to pass it forward.  It’s time to turn over a new “leaf”.  Let’s not “leave” the job unfinished–“branch” out beyond our comfort zone and bring in some leaves this autumn!

 

The Birds of the Air Have Fled…

The air is different.
Cooler
Scented with readiness…
Waiting

The birds are restless of wing;
Apples hang heavy
As people and days
Move a little faster.

Anticipating the season;
Bringing in the harvest
Preparing to face
The cold gray of winter.

This short burst of color–
This cacophony of bird chatter
And swinging scythes–
Will give way to moaning winds
And skeletal branches reaching out
To empty skies.

asphalt autumn beauty colorful
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Autumn is coming– you can feel it in the air and start to see it on the trees here.  It’s coming on to “sweater” weather.  Football, the smell of vineyards heavy with grapes and orchards filled with apples and pears.  Gardeners and farmers are tripping over pumpkins and squash, and preparing to bring in the corn, wheat, and beans.  Squirrels are starting to zip about and look for nuts  and seeds to store.

selective focus photography of squirrel
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There is a sense of urgency about this time of year– the harvest is ready to bring in; it will not wait for a more convenient moment.  Preparations for the coming winter must be completed while the good weather holds.

blue tractor next to white farm vehicle at daytime
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There is also a sense of completion and evaluation.  We look back at the summer with longing–did we make the most of sunny days and delayed sunsets?  Did we bring in a bumper crop?  And we look forward with a little anxiety– are we ready to weather the biting winds and bleak days ahead?

adult beverage breakfast celebration
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God has given us seasons– where I live, there are dramatic changes from summer to autumn– in other regions, there are changes from rainy season to dry season.  Each change gives us time to pause and notice where we have been and where we are headed.

white trash bin under red leaves tree
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The same is true in our personal lives– we go through seasons of change.  Children grow to adulthood; young parents become empty-nesters (eventually); hectic days at the office give way to days at the doctor’s office; bank accounts and circles of friends grow or shrink.

adult affection baby child
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In every season, we should give thanks– for health, youth, and wisdom, as well as trials that refine us, and discipline that shapes us.

abundance agriculture autumn decoration banana
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