Debt Free!

7“Blessed are those

    whose transgressions are forgiven,

    whose sins are covered.

Blessed is the one

    whose sin the Lord will never count against them.”

Romans 4:7-8 (NIV) via biblegateway.com (See also Psalm 32:1-2)

Ask me about my most embarrassing moment, or my greatest failure..better yet, ask one of my friends or relatives! We tend to hang on to our past, especially our mistakes, our hurts, our missed opportunities, and our shortcomings. When I taught public speaking in a local high school, I heard horror stories about why “I can’t get in front of people and talk.” The fear of public speaking rates higher in some studies than the fear of Death! And often, the fear is based on an incident from early childhood of people laughing at a small, but very public mistake. Such moments haunt us.

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As we grow older, we let our regrets live large– those things we “would have, should have, could have” done, or the things we shouldn’t have said, but can never un-say. And even if we try to move on or forget the past, there always seems to be someone who cannot let go, cannot forgive, or cannot forgive. Lives have been stunted and ruined by the ghosts of “what happened” when…

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God is all-knowing. There is nothing we’ve ever done, said, or even thought, that He “missed,” ignored, or “lost track of.” God has total recall over all the centuries and eons of time– past, present, and even future! And yet, God offers to forgive ALL our sins, and to “remember them no more.” God will never bring up “that time when you disappointed me…” God will never look at you with condemnation over anything you have confessed and repented over. It’s not that God will never be able to recall what happened; but He will no longer “charge it to your account.” He has chosen to pay the consequences in His own Blood, so that you can be debt free.

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Imagine if you had no bills. If all your mortgages, utility payments, credit card debt, medical bills–everything that you were responsible to pay– all were stamped “Paid in full.” You never had to worry about interest payments, late fees, repossession, evening phone calls from bill collectors, credit scores, etc. What a weight off your shoulders! Imagine if you had no reason to fear getting in front of a room full of people to speak or sing or give a presentation– no fear that others would judge your every hesitation, or whether your tie was straight, or your hair was mussed, or you stumbled over a word or phrase or tripped on the steps leading up to the podium. Imagine being accepted and embraced by the very one who, by rights, should be your most severe critic.

Sometimes, when we see God as our critic, our judge, or our opponent, we’re not seeing God as He really is– we’re seeing a reflection of ourselves– harsh, judgmental, unwilling to forgive others; unwilling to forgive ourselves. The very first deception of the Enemy was to distort God’s image from Creator and Sustainer to Judge and Tyrant. Yet Satan is called “The Accuser,” not God. God’s Holy Spirit may convict us of Sin– causing us to see that we have done wrong– but His purpose is always to correct and restore us, not to haunt and condemn us. Even the “worst” sins are not beyond God’s ability or willingness to forgive. Jesus forgave His accusers, His betrayers, and His executioners from the Cross!

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Forgiveness is not easy. Sin is real; it has real and terrible consequences. Sin hurts, humiliates, victimizes, and traumatizes. And its effects do not simply vanish if we say, “I forgive.” But hanging on to the pain and anger keeps us from finding and experiencing the healing and wholeness that Jesus offers. Forgiveness does not mean that the sin, or the pain, never happened– God will not “forget” injustice just because we forgive the unjust. Forgiveness means that we no longer need to try to collect the debt from someone else– because God has already promised to pay it back with interest! And forgiving yourself doesn’t mean that your past actions didn’t happen or didn’t cause pain. In fact, whenever there are opportunities to atone for past actions, or ask forgiveness from those we have wronged, we should take them. But where such opportunities are impossible for us, even when we cannot see how such pain could be redeemed or relationships restored, God has promised that we can move beyond our past mistakes and live a new , blessed, and debt-free life.

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When we approach God in prayer, we come as we are– people with past mistakes, very human emotions, including doubt and fear, and unworthy to stand on our own before a perfect God. But it is God who invites us to come to Him– debt free and embraced by His limitless Grace!

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Insult to Injury

Have you had “one of those” days lately? Nothing seems to go according to plan, and as the day goes on, it just seems to go from bad to worse. Something (or someone) comes along and adds insult to injury.

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Next week, the Church will be remembering what seemed like the last week in the ministry of Jesus Christ on earth. First comes “Palm” Sunday, commemorating Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem. Shouts of “Hosanna!” and crowds of people cheering and waving palm branches–it was as though Jesus was a rock star or a prince of Israel. But just a few short days later, he was arrested, and convicted in a corrupt “trial” by the religious officials. The same crowds who cheered him on were screaming for his death, waving fists instead of palm branches. Pilate, to please the crowd, sentenced an innocent Messiah to one of the most brutal deaths imaginable– public, excruciating, humiliating, torturous crucifixion.

Jesus didn’t just suffer death. He was mocked, insulted, deserted by his friends, lied about and lied to by those he should have been able to trust, stripped naked and whipped, and branded as a criminal as his “fate.” In such a short time, to be so crushed and betrayed, brutalized and humiliated–none of my “bad days” can compare to what Jesus went through. His injuries were horrific; the insults and betrayals were worse. Yet He bore them all. He died in anguish; broken, bruised, beaten, and abandoned.

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And He could have chosen differently. He was perfectly innocent, perfectly authorized to defend Himself, capable of calling all the Hosts of Heaven to testify on His behalf, and perfectly powerful enough to come down off the cross at any time and send all of His accusers and tormenters to oblivion! That Friday wasn’t just “one of those” days. It was not something that took Him by surprise, nor was it something He “deserved.” He chose to go through that day…it was part of His perfect plan. That day. That death. That stunning humiliation and “defeat.”

But Holy Week doesn’t end in insult, injury, defeat, or despair–because God’s ways are perfect, Jesus turned everything to Glory! We will celebrate next Friday– “Good” Friday– because only God can triumph over death, and transform horror into hope, despair into deliverance, and shame into salvation.

Even on “one of those” days, we can find peace and practice praise as we pray to the one who took “one of those” days and turned it into the greatest miracle!

Have You Any Room?

I had no idea what to write tonight, so I started thumbing through an old hymnal. A song title caught my eye– just a glance, and I turned the page, but it wouldn’t leave my mind. “Have You Any Room for Jesus?” it read. It’s an old hymn; one I don’t know, and have never sung. But there it was, and I had to turn back through the pages and look again. It’s not the sort of song we sing in our modern worship services– it’s an invitational hymn, meant for evangelistic meetings– it has little appeal to those who already consider themselves “saved”, and little appeal to those who see worship as a constant celebration, without any “awkward” conviction, confession, or heart-prodding that might make us sober and thoughtful.

And as I read it, I was struck by the absence. The words are “old-fashioned,” “melodramatic,” “quaint.” They are plaintive and urgent, and they are foreign to our modern churches.

Have you any room for Jesus,
He who bore your load of sin?
As He knocks and asks admission,
Sinner, will you let Him in?

Room for pleasure, room for business–
But for Christ, the Crucified,
Not a place that He can enter
In the heart for which He died?

Room for Jesus, King of Glory!
Hasten now; His Word obey.
Swing the heart’s door widely open;
Bid Him enter while you may
.

Sing to the Lord Hymnal– publisher and copyright unknown

We tend to be very critical of such sentiments–we don’t want to be addressed as “Sinner.” We shy away from the image of Christ knocking at the door, waiting for us to invite Him in. We want the aftermath– Jesus sitting with us in the “room” HE has prepared for us in Heaven. Without the knocking, and the waiting, and the mundane obedience. I say this critically (and after my last post, too!), but I say it with conviction of my own shortcomings in this area.

When I was a young girl, our family had a print hanging on the wall in our house. It was a common sight in many homes, as I recall, the image of Jesus standing at the door of a small house or cottage, and lifting His hand to the knocker. But that print has been criticized– the “Jesus” is “too white.” The door is not “consistent with doors Jesus would have seen in his earthly life.” The entire scenario is inconsistent with the image of Jesus that modern culture presents– Jesus “hanging out” with rough and tumble commoners at the park or marketplace, or marching in the streets seeking justice for the poor and marginalized, or “Super” Jesus riding on the clouds coming to reward the faithful and punish the wicked.

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We don’t preach a gentle Jesus who knocks at the door and “asks admission.” We don’t give altar calls and urge people to “bid Him enter while you may.” We wear Jesus jewelry, and play contemporary Christian music as we drive around in cars with “Christian” messages stuck to the bumper, and boast about all the “amazing” things God has done for US. Jesus is “cool”– He doesn’t have to knock on our door and ask for admission.

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But this is exactly how He came when He was here for His earthly mission. He was born in a stable because there “was no room” (Luke 2:7) in any of the inns at Bethlehem. He had no home of his own; “nowhere to lay his head” (Matthew 8:20). He asked for water from the woman at the well (John 4), and He invited Himself to the home of Zacchaeus (Luke 19: 1-10). And it is Jesus himself who offers the invitation in Revelation: “Behold, I stand at the door and knock..” (Revelation 3:20).

Why, then, have so many of us stopped singing songs like this? When did we stop recognizing ourselves and those around us as “sinners” who need to “swing the heart’s door widely open”? And not just once; we should be heeding the call to make “room” in our hearts and lives daily to meet with the One who bore our “load of sin.”

Lord Jesus, may I answer Your gentle knock– may I clear out the boxes of business and packages of pleasures that clutter my daily life and crowd out my time with You. May I invite You in–to talk with You, listen to You, learn from You, and enjoy Your presence every day! And help me make room to invite others to know the peace, fellowship, and salvation that You offer.

What I Didn’t Pray…

Today, I prayed.  I thanked God for Who He Is, and I lifted up those who are sick or needy.  I thanked Him for my family and friends, for the freedom to worship without fear, for His faithfulness in providing food and shelter and comforts.  I asked Him for wisdom to guide me through the new week; that I would say and do things to bring Him honor and glory.

It was a nice prayer.  A safe prayer.

I didn’t cry out my unworthiness, nor did I boldly rejoice in His Holiness, laid over me by His son’s blood.  I didn’t plead with Him on behalf of the lost and suffering.  I didn’t rage at the continued injustice and evil I see around me.  I didn’t spend precious hours listening as He whispered assurances to my soul.  I didn’t worship in the splendor of His Lovingkindness.

I got up from prayer, feeling mildly better– I had done my duty.  I had spoken with God…or spoken AT Him…I left feeling unchanged.

I sat down to write this blog on prayer.  God forgive me for thinking I have more to say to an unseen readership than to You, my Creator!

Forgive me.

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