The Door Will Be Opened…

Ask, Seek, Knock

“Ask and it will be given to you; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives; the one who seeks finds; and to the one who knocks, the door will be opened.

“Which of you, if your son asks for bread, will give him a stone? 10 Or if he asks for a fish, will give him a snake? 11 If you, then, though you are evil, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father in heaven give good gifts to those who ask him! 12 So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets.

(Matthew 7:7-12 NIV via biblegateway.com)

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A couple of years ago, I took on a part-time, temporary job with the Census Bureau in which I had to make visits to various households and ask to conduct an interview. I knocked on a lot of doors. Few of them were ever opened. Many of the houses were unoccupied– either the family wasn’t at home, or the home was vacant or even abandoned. At others, there were clearly people at home, but they wouldn’t come to the door. At still others, a person would come to the door, or respond via intercom or speaker, but they would not open up or consent to do the interview. This occurred during the height of the pandemic, so some of the fear and evasion was expected. But even though I was wearing a mask and promised to practice social distancing; even though the interview was less than 10 minutes, and would help their community and country, they would not speak to me or let me step up to or across the threshold. *(For the record, I was not required to actually enter anyone’s home to conduct an interview; most took place across the threshold or through a screen door or even out on the front steps.) A select few, however, were gracious and welcoming. They opened the door, invited me in, offered me a seat, and refreshed my spirit. I knocked on the doors of the wealthy, and those in extreme poverty. I knocked on fancy doors with cyber-security, and doors that were hanging off their hinges. I knocked on the doors of large families, and lonely widows. I knocked on the doors of the dying, and the doors of families with newborns. I knocked on the doors of mobile homes, and lake cottages, and apartments, and old farm houses. Some of the kindest people I found were in so-called “bad” neighborhoods. Some of the people who were the most gracious were those who were in the most pain, and had the least to gain by being kind. Those who were threatening and rude were quick to point out that their time was more valuable than mine– that they were too important, or too comfortable, or too busy to answer a few simple questions. In a couple of cases, I had to leave because I was threatened with harm or faced verbal abuse.

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My job required me to knock on a lot of doors! And throughout our lives, we will have to “knock” on doors– seek out opportunities, ask for needed help, go to places outside our comfort zone– and many of the doors will remain closed. Others will require that we knock several times, or even return another day to knock and seek entrance. But God will never turn away those who knock at His door. God will never tell us we must stand outside or come back at a more convenient time. He will never have a sign that says “No Trespassing,” or “Keep Out!” In fact the only thing keeping us from entering His Courts is our own refusal to accept His invitation; our own pride or guilty conscience, or resentment and rebellion; our own reluctance to approach the door, let alone knock. We don’t need an appointment, or an official summons to “Come!” The invitation is always open, and the door is not locked.

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God is not “too busy”, and our questions, requests, and praises are not “too small” to get His attention. God is gracious. God is available. God is accessible. And God’s opened door is so much more than an entry to someone’s hallway or front room or kitchen. God opens the doors to His very throne room! He invites us to “Enter His gates with thanksgiving and His courts with praise”! (Psalm 100) He invites us to the wedding feast of the Lamb (Revelations), and to everlasting life (John 3:16).

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Jesus also “knocks” at the door of our hearts, asking to “come in.” (Revelation 3:20) What does He find? Are we “away from home”– so busy chasing after foolish things that we don’t even inhabit our own hearts? Are we ignoring Him, hoping He’ll go away? Are we telling Him to come back another time, or coming up with excuses why we don’t need to speak with Him? Do we try to chase Him away with our anger or bitterness? Or do we open the door, invite Him in, and offer Him a seat?

Jesus urged His listeners on the Mount to Ask, Seek, and Knock. And then, He challenged them to “do to others what you would have them do to you.” How are we treating those who “knock” at our door? Those who need a friend, or a listening ear? Those who need to hear the truth, and the hope that is in us? Trust me– how we answer that “knock” at our door will leave an impression. It will testify to our true nature.

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God doesn’t just hear us knocking, He opens the door and gives us all we need for life and godliness (2 Peter 1:3). What are we giving to those who knock on our door?

Have You Any Room?

I had no idea what to write tonight, so I started thumbing through an old hymnal. A song title caught my eye– just a glance, and I turned the page, but it wouldn’t leave my mind. “Have You Any Room for Jesus?” it read. It’s an old hymn; one I don’t know, and have never sung. But there it was, and I had to turn back through the pages and look again. It’s not the sort of song we sing in our modern worship services– it’s an invitational hymn, meant for evangelistic meetings– it has little appeal to those who already consider themselves “saved”, and little appeal to those who see worship as a constant celebration, without any “awkward” conviction, confession, or heart-prodding that might make us sober and thoughtful.

And as I read it, I was struck by the absence. The words are “old-fashioned,” “melodramatic,” “quaint.” They are plaintive and urgent, and they are foreign to our modern churches.

Have you any room for Jesus,
He who bore your load of sin?
As He knocks and asks admission,
Sinner, will you let Him in?

Room for pleasure, room for business–
But for Christ, the Crucified,
Not a place that He can enter
In the heart for which He died?

Room for Jesus, King of Glory!
Hasten now; His Word obey.
Swing the heart’s door widely open;
Bid Him enter while you may
.

Sing to the Lord Hymnal– publisher and copyright unknown

We tend to be very critical of such sentiments–we don’t want to be addressed as “Sinner.” We shy away from the image of Christ knocking at the door, waiting for us to invite Him in. We want the aftermath– Jesus sitting with us in the “room” HE has prepared for us in Heaven. Without the knocking, and the waiting, and the mundane obedience. I say this critically (and after my last post, too!), but I say it with conviction of my own shortcomings in this area.

When I was a young girl, our family had a print hanging on the wall in our house. It was a common sight in many homes, as I recall, the image of Jesus standing at the door of a small house or cottage, and lifting His hand to the knocker. But that print has been criticized– the “Jesus” is “too white.” The door is not “consistent with doors Jesus would have seen in his earthly life.” The entire scenario is inconsistent with the image of Jesus that modern culture presents– Jesus “hanging out” with rough and tumble commoners at the park or marketplace, or marching in the streets seeking justice for the poor and marginalized, or “Super” Jesus riding on the clouds coming to reward the faithful and punish the wicked.

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We don’t preach a gentle Jesus who knocks at the door and “asks admission.” We don’t give altar calls and urge people to “bid Him enter while you may.” We wear Jesus jewelry, and play contemporary Christian music as we drive around in cars with “Christian” messages stuck to the bumper, and boast about all the “amazing” things God has done for US. Jesus is “cool”– He doesn’t have to knock on our door and ask for admission.

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But this is exactly how He came when He was here for His earthly mission. He was born in a stable because there “was no room” (Luke 2:7) in any of the inns at Bethlehem. He had no home of his own; “nowhere to lay his head” (Matthew 8:20). He asked for water from the woman at the well (John 4), and He invited Himself to the home of Zacchaeus (Luke 19: 1-10). And it is Jesus himself who offers the invitation in Revelation: “Behold, I stand at the door and knock..” (Revelation 3:20).

Why, then, have so many of us stopped singing songs like this? When did we stop recognizing ourselves and those around us as “sinners” who need to “swing the heart’s door widely open”? And not just once; we should be heeding the call to make “room” in our hearts and lives daily to meet with the One who bore our “load of sin.”

Lord Jesus, may I answer Your gentle knock– may I clear out the boxes of business and packages of pleasures that clutter my daily life and crowd out my time with You. May I invite You in–to talk with You, listen to You, learn from You, and enjoy Your presence every day! And help me make room to invite others to know the peace, fellowship, and salvation that You offer.

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