A Mighty Wind

It’s been very windy here lately. Even when the sun is shining, the wind still makes it feel like winter (which, technically, it still is)! I don’t know that I have ever bothered to thank God for wind. After all, most of the time, we think of wind as being destructive–tornados, hurricanes, typhoons–winds tend to blow things over, knock things down, and they are often accompanied by water in the form of rain, waves, or hail.

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God created wind. He uses it for many good purposes that we may ignore or take for granted:

  • God used winds to dry up the waters after the great flood. (see Genesis 8:1)
  • God used a strong wind to blow locusts into Egypt as one of the plagues demonstrating His power to Pharaoh. He used another strong wind to blow them back out of the land and into the Red Sea. (see Exodus 10: 13-19)
  • God used a mighty wind to blow on the Red Sea, dividing the waters and allowing the Israelites to escape from the Egyptian army that pursued them. (Exodus 14)
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  • God used a wind to blow thousands of quail into the Israelite camp, providing so much meat that they got sick from it! (Numbers 11)
  • God often demonstrates His power, authority, and judgment through wind. (see Amos 4:13; Psalm 78:26; Jeremiah 10:13; Jonah 1 and 4; etc.)
  • God sent His Holy Sprit on Pentecost with a sound like a mighty rushing wind (Acts 2:2)
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Wind moves things. Without at least some wind, the air becomes stagnant, wind-borne seeds cannot find a home, and flying creatures must work harder to stay aloft. Wind can act as a cleanser, blowing away dead leaves and dust so that new growth can occur. Wind moves the waters– from gentle ripples to white-capped waves–pushing along the boats and ships over lakes and seas. Wind bears clouds and brings gentle rains and shade from the harsh sun. Wind can be directed for power in windmills and wind tunnels. Wind can even “sing” as it whistles through bare tree branches or moves wind chimes.

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One of the most unusual uses of wind in the Bible happened to the great prophet Elijah. In 1Kings19:11, God told Elijah to stand on the mountain. Elijah had fled for his life from the wrath of Jezebel and Ahab. He was discouraged to the point of death. God sent a strong and destructive wind, but His presence wasn’t in it. He sent an earthquake, but His presence wasn’t in that, either. Finally, in the stillness, God appeared to Elijah and gave him a message of hope and encouragement. Sometimes, the winds come, not as a judgment, not as a message, but as a signal that God wants us to be still. HE is the mover; HE is the wind– but He is also in the middle of the stillness, if we are ready to listen!

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I don’t know that I have ever bothered to thank God for wind. I take it for granted when it is gentle, and I dislike it when it is destructive– even when it just musses my hair or makes me shiver on an otherwise sunny day. But today, I thank God that He has the power, wisdom, and authority to use wind for His purposes. May He blow away all that is old and stagnant in my life, and move me to see His power at work in the world around me today. Thank You, God!

In My Heart There Rings a Melody

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As I write this, the sun is shining and glinting off new-fallen snow. It’s been a mostly pleasant day, and I’m writing this in anticipation of a pleasant weekend. This will post on Monday morning– a brand new week, hopefully filled with new opportunities and adventures. Of course, not every day is like this. Some days are dreary, full of stress and anxiety, and filled with challenges and even tragedies. But I have been thinking about a song I learned in childhood, one that has blessed me over the years and helped me on many a dreary day, as well as on days like today.

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“I have a song that Jesus gave me,
It was sent from heav’n above;
There never was a sweeter melody,
‘Tis a melody of love.

I love the Christ who died on Calv’ry,
For He washed my sins away;
He put within my heart a melody,
And I know it’s there to stay.

In my heart there rings a melody,
There rings a melody with heaven’s harmony;
In my heart there rings a melody,
There rings a melody of love.

‘Twill be my endless theme in glory,
With the angels I will sing;
‘Twill be a song with glorious harmony,
When the courts of heaven ring.

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On days like today, it is easy to sing a happy tune– sunlight, shimmering snow and icicles, viewed from my nice cozy perch by the window–but the joyful song that Jesus brings rings through good days and bad; sorrow and stress; triumphs and failures. It is eternal and filled with the limitless Love of God. It is a song of peace that passes all understanding, and a confidence that sees beyond circumstances.

Sometimes, when life seems devoid of light and peace, it has less to do with our actual circumstances, and more to do with our unwillingness to look up from them. Throughout the Old Testament (and even in the New Testament) people would create songs as part of their worship–some songs celebrated God’s provision and protection; others spoke of His character and His faithfulness. But these songs weren’t just for celebration and services of worship– they were used to remind us in good times and bad, that God’s love never changes. The same God who brings victory and miracles will be with us in times of despair. The same God who sees us in our most desperate hour of need is there with us when we are enjoying a beautiful sunset.

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Today, I pray that we would take a few moments, find a song or a Psalm, and just sing a prayer to our maker. It doesn’t have to be a peppy song of praise– it may even be a song of yearning or anguish– but let it be a song that rises above our day and finds the ear of the One who loves us better than anyone else. It doesn’t matter if you can’t carry a tune; God listens to the heart! Sing the song that Jesus gives to you today. Your heart will be blessed. And it will bless the very heart of your Maker, as well.

Shadows…

Today is a day of shadows.

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In the U.S. and Canada, it is “Groundhog” Day: on this day, tradition says that if a groundhog (a rodent also known as a woodchuck) comes out of its burrow and sees its shadow, we will have six more weeks of winter. (If it doesn’t see its shadow, we’re supposed to have an earlier spring, but I have never known this to be the case.) Supposedly, the groundhog is frightened of its shadow and returns to hibernate for six weeks. It seems sort of counter-intuitive: a sunny day should indicate that spring is just around the corner. Seeing its shadow should be a “good” sign for the groundhog.

Today is also a special day in the global Church calendar. Known as “Candlemas” or Presentation Day, it represents the day that Jesus was presented in the Temple and Mary went through the purification rites required for Jewish women after the birth of a son. (see Leviticus 12:1-8; Luke 2:22-40) The gospel writer includes two other encounters that took place in the Temple courts. A man named Simeon, and a woman named Anna both offer praises for this child– the fulfillment of hundreds of years of prophecy, dating back to the Mosaic Laws. And Simeon also offers a warning to Mary– a “shadow” of things to come and prophecies yet to be fulfilled (v. 35).

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Winter can be dreary, and filled with shadows– both real and figurative, natural and spiritual. But shadows only appear when there is also light. May we be reminded on this day– whether it is a day of shadows, sunshine, or cloud cover– that Jesus came to be the “Light” of the world. And we should never be “afraid of our own shadow.” Indeed, as we cast our own shadows through our words and actions, may they point others toward the true light. And as we face the shadows that fall in our way, may we remember that they are only that– shadows– Light has overcome the darkness!

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Whiter Than Snow

Today, I am choosing to be thankful for snow. I don’t really like driving in it, or shoveling it, but there are some wonderful things about snow. God made it– in fact, the Bible says He has storehouses full of it (Job 38:22)! So what are some of the wonders of snow?

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  • Snow acts as a natural insulator of soil, roots, and underground bulbs and plants. When temperatures plummet, the snow acts as a blanket, protecting all that lies below ground.
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  • Snow– especially new-fallen, clean snow, reflects light and brightens the landscape. With less natural sunlight, this is very important, not just for plants, but for people. Physical and mental health is enhanced when we get adequate amounts of light. Visibility is also enhanced– even at night!– when there is a snowy ground-cover.
  • Snow is a better way to add moisture to the air and ground in winter–when winter rainfall freezes, it is much heavier and more dangerous than snowfall.
  • Snow can be fun! Skiing, sledding, making snowmen, and snow forts– it’s not just fun for children.
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  • Snow can be good for business! Ski resorts, plowing services, parks with cross-country ski trails, and many others depend on snow.
  • Snow accumulates– especially in mountainous regions– and refreshes rivers and lakes as it melts in the spring. Running water from snowmelts feed brooks and streams, and replenishes underground springs and wells as it seeps in. In this way, God gently wakes up mountainside forests and glens, turning them from white (or gray) to vibrant green.
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  • Snow is beautiful! (Especially if I don’t have to drive in it or shovel it.) It glistens on the bare tree branches and settles in mounds on the fields. It sparkles in the moonlight and glories in the sunrise. It delights us as it dances on the air, swirling and hovering and settling on our eyelashes or fingertips, only to melt away like a dream. We hear often about the marvel of snowflakes– each one is completely unique in its design and makeup. We may even take it for granted– especially after a particularly large snowstorm! But God chooses to lavishly pour out His creativity and love into each tiny flake that falls to the ground and melts with a mere breath. How much more does He pour out His love on each one of us!
  • God uses snow as a metaphor for His forgiveness. See Psalm 51:7, Isaiah 1:18. “Snow” white is considered pure, radiant, and refreshing. In just such a way, God can take our failures and mistakes, and replace them with His righteousness, making us pure, radiant, and able to be refreshed and to offer refreshment to others!
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What Can I Give Him?

In the Bleak Midwinter

words by Christina Rossetti


1 In the bleak midwinter, frosty wind made moan, 
earth stood hard as iron, water like a stone; 
snow had fallen, snow on snow, snow on snow, 
in the bleak midwinter, long ago.

2 Our God, heaven cannot hold him, nor earth sustain; 
heaven and earth shall flee away when he comes to reign. 
In the bleak midwinter a stable place sufficed 
the Lord God Almighty, Jesus Christ. 

3 Angels and archangels may have gathered there, 
cherubim and seraphim thronged the air; 
but his mother only, in her maiden bliss, 
worshiped the beloved with a kiss. 

4 What can I give him, poor as I am? 
If I were a shepherd, I would bring a lamb; 
if I were a Wise Man, I would do my part; 
yet what I can I give him: give my heart.



United Methodist Hymnal, 1989
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I love this Christmas Hymn, though it creates a picture that is likely very false.  Historically, we have no reason to believe that Jesus’ birth occurred on the 25th of December, or even in the winter at all.  And even if it was December, it is very unlikely that the Middle-Eastern countryside was experiencing frosty moaning winds or icy waters on the night of Christ’s birth.
In addition to Mary, the Bible tells us of others who came to worship that night– the shepherds in the nearby hills.  The wise men likely came days, weeks, or even months later to bring their gifts.  And Joseph would certainly have been there, as well.

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The song is still lovely, and the last verse is the key.  Christ poured out all that He was; taking on the form of a helpless baby, He lived among those who rejected and mocked Him.  He served those whom He had created, healing their wounds, forgiving their sins, providing for their eternal redemption.  He died, betrayed and despised by His own chosen people, and dismissed by the rulers and authorities of the day.  He never owned a home, built monuments, carved his name in stone, or wrote books to preserve his legacy.  He had no dynasty or even children to carry on his name; at the time of his death, all his friends and followers had abandoned him– all but one disciple and his mother.  Yet his birth (the actual date of which has been obscured by history) is synonymous with generous gifting, rejoicing, singing, worship, and renewed hope.  So what could any of us possibly give that could even begin to match what His life, death, and resurrection gave us?

He asks for only one thing– everything we have: all the failures, mistakes, good intentions, bad choices, selfish desires, and hurts of the past–and in return, He gives us everything beyond our wildest imaginations: eternity with Him; all the riches of His Glory; all His holiness and majesty imputed to us; peace with Him; rest and restoration in Him; and His Spirit to guide and sustain us!

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The bleakness of midwinter may not have been the physical setting of Christ’s birth, but it represents the spiritual setting of our lives without Him.  In that sense, Christ comes in the bleak midwinter of our rebellion, our despair, and our isolation, and offers to give us everlasting light, hope, peace, and joy!

That’s worth celebrating every day throughout eternity!

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